Thursday, October 11, 2012

Poetry Text Sets

Once we get comfortable sharing poetry with young people, it can be especially meaningful to share SETS of poetry books gathered around similarities. Such “text sets” can prompt lessons of compare/contrast and discussion of poetic voice, stylistic choices, etc. This is emerging as a very popular approach for infusing poetry throughout the reading/language arts curriculum and for addressing the new Common Core standards.

In my recent Poetry Teacher's Book of Lists, I have gathered lists of poetry text sets in four categories: for very young children (ages 0-5), for elementary aged children (ages 5-12), for middle school (ages 11-14), and for young adults (ages 13 and up). However, these are general recommendations based on overall readability and appeal. These poetry selections are certainly suitable for a much wider age range. Each mini set includes 3 or more poetry books authored by one poet, focused on a single topic or theme, and formatted to be very similar in design and appearance. This aids in guiding discussion, comparison, and analysis.

I'll share these lists in installments for ease of access. So, here are the poetry text sets I would recommend for sharing with very young children. Please let me know if you have other favorites that I should add.

FOR VERY YOUNG CHILDREN (ages 0-5)

Folk-based rhymes (bilingual Spanish/English)
Ada, Alma Flor and Campoy, Isabel. 2010. Muu, Moo! Rimas de animales/Animal Nursery Rhymes. Rayo/HarperCollins.
Ada, Alma Flor, and Isabel Campoy. Ed. 2003. Pio Peep! Traditional Spanish Nursery Rhymes. New York: HarperCollins.
Ada, Alma Flor and Campoy, F. Isabel. 2011. Ten Little Puppies; Diez perritos. Rayo/HarperCollins.

Song-based rhymes (bilingual Spanish/English)
Delacre, Lulu. Ed. 1992. Arroz con Leche: Popular Songs and Rhymes from Latin America. New York: Scholastic.
Delacre, Lulu. Ed. 1992. Las Navidades: Popular Christmas Songs from Latin America. New York: Scholastic.
Delacre, Lulu. 2004. Arrorró Mi Niño: Latino Lullabies and Gentle Games. New York: Scholastic.

Folk songs and fingerplays (bilingual Spanish/English)
Orozco, José Luis. 2002. Diez Deditos: Ten Little Fingers and Other Play Rhymes and Action Songs from Latin America. New York: Dutton.
Orozco, José Luis.1994. Fiestas: A Year of Latin American Songs of Celebration. New York: Dutton.
Orozco, Jose-Luis. 1994. De Colores and Other Latin-American Folk Songs for Children. New York: Dutton.

Animal rhymes
Elliott, David. 2008. On the Farm. Somerville, MA: Candlewick.
Elliott, David. 2010. In the Wild. Somerville, MA: Candlewick.
Elliott, David. 2012. In the Sea. Somerville, MA: Candlewick.

Poems to read aloud with a parent/adult
Hoberman, Mary Ann. 2001. You Read to Me, I’ll Read to You; Very Short Stories to Read Together. Ill. by Michael Emberley. Boston: Little, Brown.
Hoberman, Mary Ann. 2004. You Read to Me, I’ll Read to You; Very Short Fairy Tales to Read Together. Ill. by Michael Emberley. Boston: Little, Brown.
Hoberman, Mary Ann. 2005. You Read to Me, I’ll Read to You; Very Short Mother Goose Tales to Read Together. Ill. by Michael Emberley. Boston: Little, Brown.
Hoberman, Mary Ann. 2007. You Read to Me, I’ll Read to You; Very Short Scary Tales to Read Together. Ill. by Michael Emberley. Boston: Little, Brown.

Any other groupings of poetry books that you find particularly effective for sharing with young children? Or favorite activities? I welcome suggestions!

Join the rest of the Poetry Friday fun at Teaching Young Writers. See you there!

1 comment:

Betsy said...

I will be bookmarking this post and revisiting. What a great list of resources for a teacher like me! Thank you so much for sharing this today.